Story of WP668 – Western Pacific Railroad Historical Convention

Katy Dickinson and John Plocher with UP1983 engine, Western Pacific Railroad Historical Convention, Reno Nevada, May 2017 IMG_1038

John and I took a road trip from the Silicon Valley to Reno and Carson City Nevada a week ago. I presented the “Story of Western Pacific Caboose 668” to the annual Western Pacific Railroad Historical Conference in Reno, Nevada.  The convention is put on by the Feather River Rail Society.  I was the only woman speaker! While in Reno, we toured Jim Petro’s remarkable model train layout – Jim is a master railroad modeler and scenery builder.  His layout runs on the JMRI software that John helped to create – and uses John’s DCC Brakeman as well.  We also were able to visit Union Pacific’s UP1983 locomotive in the old Western Pacific colors that was brought to Reno for the convention.

On the drive home, we looped through Carson City, Nevada, to visit the WP657 caboose (sister to our own WP668).  WP657 was moved to the Nevada State Railroad Museum from the Ponderosa Ranch.  The inside of WP657 is intact.  We enjoyed our special tour, seeing all of the original furniture, cabinets, and fittings that are missing from WP668.  We came back to California over Carson Pass in the snow and fog, and saw the very-full Carson River dumping its snow melt.

Katy Dickinson telling Story of WP668 - Western Pacific Railroad Historical Convention, May 2017 IMG_0995

Western Pacific Railroad Historical Convention, May 2017 IMG_0842

John Plocher with Jim Petro's model train layout control, 5 May 2017 IMG_0915

John Plocher and Jim Petro, 5 May 2017 IMG_0930

Reno, Nevada, May 2017 IMG_1079

Caboose WP657, Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City Nevada, IMG_1135

Inside Caboose WP657, Nevada State Railroad Museum, Carson City Nevada IMG_1176

Sierras waterfall, Carson River West Fork, IMG_1334

Near Carson Pass, Nevada, May 2017 IMG_1366

If you want to receive Katysblog posts by email, please sign up using the Sign Me Up! button (upper right).
Images Copyright 2017 by Katy Dickinson

Leave a comment

Filed under Caboose Project and Other Trains, Home & Family, News & Reviews

Easter Egg Hunt 2017

Thoko Miya and WP668 - Easter, April 2017 IMG_9858

Catching up on my postings… Easter was on Sunday 16 April in 2017 and as usual we had friends, family, and neighbors over for a potluck brunch and Easter Egg Hunt in our back garden and on WP668. The Associate Easter Bunny wrote a very difficult set of riddles for the adults to find the Gold and Silver Eggs – one of the clues was on Twitter! Jessica, Matthew, Paul, and John all helped – as did our house guest Thoko Miya from South Africa. John cooked Maqluba (chicken and rice “upside down” from Jordan) which was much appreciated!

Jessica and Matthew and Paul - Easter, April 2017 IMG_9855

John and Larissa Shapiro and Maqluba - Easter, April 2017 IMG_9926

Paul and kids - Easter, April 2017 IMG_9933

Gold egg found - Easter, April 2017 IMG_9911

Silver Egg

    • I am a beautiful-bold building block,
    • a 1-to-2 ton ballerina queen.
    • My reach spreads from Iskanderia to
    • where Toko lives (though there are fewer of
    • my ances-sisters bellowing than lived
    • there free when Ibn Batuta roved from
    • the Cape to Cairo and Mongol Guangzhou,
    • from shadowed Fez to wet-and-wild Mosul.)
    • I’m sunning myself in the shade of yolks
    • that hold their albumen inside their skins,
    • that parents feed their dogs for YouTube lulz,
    • and babies cry-smile when first they taste them.
    • So far I’ve led you on a lumbering chase
    • Msr, AsSeen, Arak — where is my place?

(the Silver Egg was hidden in the dirt, under a concrete hippo, under a lemon tree)

Gold Egg

    • Six unkind clues will guide
    • you briskly to my haunt,
    • in shadow where I hide.
    • Get hopping – it’s a jaunt!
    • You’ll climb among downed-trees
    • and wander through spike-leaves…
    • Hop quickly so Ethan won’t flaunt!

(the Gold Egg was on top of the light bulb, inside the glass cover of the overhead light fixture, on the porch)

Gold Egg – Clue 1

    • I’m surrounded by pot apparatus
    • But it’s not a medicinal grow.
    • You’ll not have to climb up to the attics
    • or wander wader-deep in the snow.
    • You’ll just have to walk
    • to a gate that unlocks
    • and find out where Paul’s clay does go.

Gold Egg – Clue 2

    • The next clue is online
    • you’ll practically titter
    • when you see the next poem
    • is posted on Twitter.

Gold Egg – Clue 3 – from Twitter

    • Upon a bright flower
    • You’ll find my small bower.
    • Not on a rosethorn,
    • or leaf-ling of corn
    • – under cactus and dragon I glower.

Gold Egg – Clue 4

    • Under Princess’s butt I was warming
    • My contents I hope you’ll find charming
    • But because she’s a cat
    • And upon me she sat
    • My message by now will be warming.

Gold Egg – Clue 5

    • You’ve lined up and squarely stood still
    • You’ve caught-on and gotten your fill
    • and now hear’s the treat:
    • an Easter-hunt feat
    • You’ll find me outside grey-bird’s sill.

Egg hunt - Easter, April 2017 IMG_9903

If you want to receive Katysblog posts by email, please sign up using the Sign Me Up! button (upper right).
Images Copyright 2017 by Katy Dickinson

Leave a comment

Filed under Church, Home & Family

CIC Article: Education for Ministry at Elmwood Jail

Correctional Institutions Chaplaincy CIC Ministries, Education for Ministry at Elmwood Jail Article, April 2017

It was an honor to be featured in an article by the Correctional Institutions Chaplaincy (CIC) called “Education for Ministry at Elmwood Jail”. The article tells the story of how CIC, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, the Episcopal Diocese of El Camino Real, the University of the South – School of Theology’s Education for Ministry program and I have worked together since late 2015 to create a new jail-based college-level theological education program.

We have almost completed two 9-month terms and are getting ready to expand the program into a second Elmwood jail dorm.  If you are interested in volunteering in a Santa Clara County (Silicon Valley) jail, please contact the Correctional Institutions Chaplaincy (CIC).

11 May 2017 update: Another article was recently published about our Elmwood Jail program in the alumni magazine “From the Mountain” – from the University of the South – School of Theology, Sewanee Tennessee, Spring 2017 edition. The article is called “Inmates Explore Faith, Life Through Education for Ministry” by Kevin Cummings. Links to these articles:

Leave a comment

Filed under Church, Mentoring & Other Business, News & Reviews

TechWomen Kyrgyzstan Delegation

TechWomen Delegation Kyrgyzstan 2017 at US Ambassador Residence Bishkek

I was part of the TechWomen Delegation to Kyrgyzstan from 23 February – 4 March 2017 in Central Asia. We spent a week giving talks and making presentations to women, girls, technical startups and the STEM community.  35 participated in the Delegation – from the USA, Uzbekistan, Kazakhstan, and of course Kyrgyzstan. In addition to the mentors from the Silicon Valley and San Francisco Bay Area and the Fellows from Central Asia, our Delegation included staff from the Institute of International Education and the US State Department.

Three of us had an accidental tour of Istanbul getting to Kyrgyzstan since our flight connections didn’t.  We hired a driver during our day of waiting for the next Bishkek flight and saw Istanbul’s Blue Mosque, Hagia Sophia, and other remarkable locations in that beautiful and cosmopolitan city.  Since there is a Travel Warning for Turkey, we avoided crowded areas.

Each Delegation member had the opportunity to give several professional presentations. In addition to general mentoring sessions, my presentation topics included: Successful Mentorship (at the Kyrgyz State Agrarian Academy), Crowd Funding (part of the “Silicon Valley Experts Symposium” hosted by the US Ambassador, Sheila Gwaltney and the Kyrgyzstan Information Technology State Committee), Women in Tech: Challenges and Opportunities (at StartUp Tuesday), Social Media Marketing and Professional Networking (at the Kyrgyz-Turkish Manas University), and Challenges and Opportunities in STEM Careers (in the American Corner, for high school students). After the presentations were over, a small group of us rented a bus and drove to see the remarkable 9th century minaret called the Burana Tower near Tokmok.

The day I arrived in Bishkek was when my mother died.    I knew when I left that this was a possibility even though I thought (and hoped) she would be with us much longer.  I had made all of the preparations in advance and both of my brothers were with her when she died.  I saw continuing my participation in the Delegation as a tribute to the woman my mother raised me to be – but it was hard to be away from home at such a time.

Katy Dickinson at the Istanbul Blue Mosque, Feb 2017

Katy Dickinson, Nandini Ramani, Judith Fleenor at Hagia Sophia Istanbul Feb 2017

TechWomen Delegation Kyrgyzstan 2017 schedule

TechWomen Kyrgyzstan Delegation 2017 Katy Dickinson and IdaRose Sylvester with Kurmanjan Datka statue Bishkek

TechWomen Delegation Kyrgyzstan 2017 in the snow

TechWomen Delegation Kyrgyzstan 2017 at Robotics Fair, Physics and Mathematics School‐Lyceum, Bishkek

TechWomen Kyrgyzstan Delegation at Kyrgyz‐Turkish Manas University 2017

TechWomen Kyrgyzstan Delegation 2017 at Burana Tower

TechWomen Kyrgyzstan Delegation 2017 near Burana Tower

TechWomen Kyrgyzstan Delegation 2017 Katy Dickinson with Nancy Talbot and Rebecca Biswas

If you want to receive Katysblog posts by email, please sign up using the Sign Me Up! button (upper right).

Images Copyright 2017 by Katy Dickinson

Leave a comment

Filed under Mentoring Standard, News & Reviews

Eleanor Dickinson Art – New Website Launched

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson painting called 13 Myeongsuk, in Colored pastel 2005

My family and I just launched the new Eleanor Dickinson Art website on which you can see information about my mother, Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson, and purchase some of her fine art, posters, and books.

Eleanor Dickinson Art contains selections of original creations from the archives of Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson, a remarkable American artist who was actively creating, teaching, and exhibiting fine art for over 75 years. Her work has been exhibited at many dozens of galleries and museums around the world, and is collected by a wide variety of individuals, universities, museums and other major institutions, including:

Fine art is a reflection of the soul – this website includes nudes.

In addition to getting more of Eleanor Dickinson’s creations into the world to be seen and enjoyed, the new website provides photographs and information about the artist: her Statement, Resume, Obituary, and Reviews. The About page includes information about the Art, Shipping and Additional Charges, the Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson Charitable Art Trust, Paper, and other topics.

Thanks to Jessica Dickinson Goodman and John Plocher for their help in setting up the Eleanor Dickinson Art website. Thanks also to those of you who reviewed the site while it was in development.

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson poster called Revival - The Tennessee State Museum, 1982

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson line drawing called Revival - 2. Almost Persuaded, 1976

Images Copyright Eleanor Dickinson Art 1976-2005

Leave a comment

Filed under Home & Family, News & Reviews

You Will Never Get it All Done

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson ceramic life mask by Ruth Asawa

My mother, Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson, passed away peacefully at the age of 86, on 25 February 2017 in San Jose, California, surrounded by family. Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson was a remarkable American artist who was actively creating, teaching, and exhibiting fine art for over 75 years. ​ ​She touched the lives of so many who were inspired by her and her work. Her personal motto was: “You Will Never Get it All Done”.

My mother will be buried with her husband, my father, Wade Dickinson in Knoxville, Tennessee, this ​weekend. I know I will see some of you there. However, many will not able to attend. We will also have a San Francisco Bay Area Memorial Service to which you are also invited – RSVP if you can join us, or if you have questions.

2 pm on Sunday, 28 May 2017
Saint Andrew’s Episcopal Church
13601 Saratoga Avenue, Saratoga, California 95070

I​n lieu of flowers, please consider donating to the University of Tennessee – Knoxville’s Ewing Museum.

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson 1970 Elkmont

My Mother’s Obituary
(written by my daughter Jessica)

Eleanor Evelyn Vaughan Creekmore Dickinson
Resident of San Francisco
February 7, 1931 – February 25, 2017

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson was a powerful artist, dedicated professor, and beloved friend and matriarch. She passed away peacefully, surrounded by family at home in California on February 25, 2017, just after her 86th birthday.

Eleanor built a successful art career on solo shows that boldly depicted those who she called “unpopular and unlikely subjects.” She reveled in transgressing the assumptions of medium, using lucite, black velvet, video, and sky-writing as fine art materials. For all her high-flying passions, Eleanor was deeply rooted. She returned to her birthplace in Knoxville, Tennessee, nearly every year of her life, and her decades-long work documenting Pentecostal revivals throughout the region is housed at the Smithsonian. Her love and effort helped ensure that the Elkmont cabins where she spent her girlhood summers were designated a National Historic District.

Eleanor’s art and life were a study in chiaroscuro, of light bringing shape to the darkness. She was a former Daughter of the Confederacy who marched for civil rights. She lived in San Francisco’s posh Pacific Heights but worked at her warehouse studio in Oakland. She striped her hair black-and-white with electric blue or pink streak to shock socialites in San Francisco but she dyed it brown again to ease her way with the worshippers she sang with at the revivals. In her early 20s, she married a West Point man who worked in the oil and arms businesses but the largest work of art in her living room was a piece she had drawn showing the torture of an Iraqi man by US soldiers stationed at Abu Ghraib prison. She’d drawn that ghastly scene on a canvas of black velvet, using the light to show the man’s pained form crucified. It was a medium she’d picked-up from those revival worshippers. She used her gifts to cast light on the darkest parts of being alive, like the 40 watt light bulbs that brought light to revival tents in the Knoxville night.

Eleanor liked light, music, crowds, noise, and trouble — causing it; getting out of it; drawing it. She loved to pick a gleeful fight. She reveled in protest. She founded organizations, served on boards, and supported groups that she believed would better the lives of women, artists, people of color, and anyone she saw being mistreated. Her sense of justice was immense and uncompromising. She did everything she could to fix our broken world.

But the most vital part of her was always dedicated to art. The quiet hours of drawing, drafting and redrafting, a cooling cup of coffee always at hand on a wobbly wooden antique stool, heaps of white gum eraser filling her lap and getting on the cats. She kept cats her whole life, along with iguanas and rabbits, tarantulas and frogs. Eleanor included her animals in whatever she was working on at the time — if they sat still long enough. Drawing was her life and she drew life out of every medium she put her hand to.

Eleanor’s work was shown most recently in the exhibits “Artists and Their Models” at the Smithsonian Archives in 2014, and “Old Lovers” that same year at the Peninsula Museum of Art. She was recognized nationally in her lifetime with public collections and archives hosted by the Smithsonian’s Archive of American Art, the Library of Congress’s Archive of Folk Culture, the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, the Tennessee State Museum, the Oakland Museum, and the University of Tennessee Libraries, among many others.

She received a Lifetime Service Award from California Lawyers for the Arts (2016), the Lifetime Achievement Award from Women’s Caucus for Art (2003), and was named an Emerita Professor of Drawing by California College of the Arts after serving as a professor there for 30 years. Throughout her career, she was recognized by being named an Artist-in-Residence at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco (2000), Arkansas State University (1993), University of Alaska (1991), and University of Tennessee (1969). She was honored with the Women’s Caucus for Art President’s Award (1995), a Distinguished Service Award from National League of American Pen Women (1989), the Distinguished Alumni Award from the San Francisco Art Institute (1984), a Distinguished Alumni Citation from her alma mater the National Cathedral School (1978), awards from the San Francisco Arts Commission (1973 and 1968), and finally an Award of Merit from the City of San Francisco (1968).

She co-authored and illustrated several books, including That Old Time Religion (1975) and Revival! (1974) with her late childhood friend and Knoxvillian writer Barbara Benziger. The above list is a brief selection of her recognitions and her impact and is just one measure of a life vibrantly lived.

Those who knew and loved Eleanor miss her terribly. We miss her creativity, her activism, her sharp wit; most of all, we miss her friendship. Go with God.

Eleanor was preceded by her mother and father, Evelyn and Robert E. Creekmore, her brothers Bobby and Richard Creekmore, and her husband, Ben Wade Oakes Dickinson III (1926-2011). She is survived by her sister Louise Creekmore Senatore of Knoxville, her three children, Peter Dickinson of La Crescenta, CA, Katy Dickinson of San Jose, and Dr. Mark Dickinson of Boston, and her six grandchildren, Daniel and Lynda, Forrest and Corey, Paul and Jessica. She will be missed by everyone around her.

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson Obituary March 2017

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson 1971

Eleanor Creekmore Dickinson July 2016

If you want to receive Katysblog posts by email, please sign up using the Sign Me Up! button (upper right).

Images Copyright 1971-2016 by Katy Dickinson

2 Comments

Filed under Home & Family, News & Reviews

Barbara Merrill in Tanzania

Barbara Merrill, Tanzania 2016 img_0080

Barbara Merrill describes herself in her email signature as a “Certified Ergonomist and A Very Good Friend” – and she is indeed both. Barbara is also a parishioner at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church and a person with albinism (PWA).

In these last two capacities, Barbara celebrated her retirement by traveling to Tanzania to help albino children and their families. She worked with a Cerebral Palsy Clinic, visited the Mennonite Central Committee (MCC) Step by Step school and other schools in Arusha, participated in an Albinism Conference to educate village leaders in Ngorongoro Crater, and visited an Asante Miriamu Foundation clinic and children’s camp in Kigoma and Kabanga.

This month, Barbara gave a report to St. Andrew’s called “Trip to Tanzania” about her 5 November 2016 – 12 December 2016 travels. Some facts she presented about Tanzania:

  • 70% of the population is rural
  • Capital Dar es Salaam and Dodoma
  • 68% below poverty level
  • Large percentage of population under 15 years old Generally high birth rate about 5 per woman
  • High infant mortality rate – nutrition, early and frequent pregnancies, inadequate maternal health.
  • Tourism is about 20% of the Tanzanian Economy

One of the most interesting of her slides for me was called “Myths About Albinism”

  • PWAs are ghosts
  • Mother slept with a white man
  • They don’t die just fade away
  • Magical powers
  • PWAs are evil
  • Albinism a curse or punishment
  • PWAs have pink eyes
  • Albinism is contagious

Thanks to Barbara for her dedication, teaching, and great heart!

Barbara Merrill, Kabanga Camp, Tanzania 2016 img_0080

Barbara Merrill, Asante Miriamu Gates Tanzania, 2016 img_0084

Barbara Merrill Tanzania 2016 img_0066

Images Copyright Barbara Merrill 2016

Leave a comment

Filed under Church, News & Reviews